Name: Fatima Minor

Location: Moscow, Russia

Discipline: Fixed gear

What does riding mean to you?

Speed ​​and independence. I bought my first fix with the intention of quick moving across the city and being less in the underground, because Moscow is a constant rush for me. It takes 4 hours of commuting by train every day. Endless waiting for transport is also an issue.

But I didn’t expect the bike to completely change my life. When I realized I am addicted to the bike, it was too late. I spend the same 4 hours on commuting, but on the bike now. So the day is never wasted, whatever it is.

There was a point of time, when I forgot how to walk, because I rode my bike to work, to gym, home or just to laze around. My friends were surprised and asked how I can ride so long distances so fast. Now I want to admit that it rarely came easy for me.

Moscow is a rather hilly city and sometimes roads are not the most pleasant. But this is the whole thrill! Constant overcoming of oneself, constant struggling, constant training – these gives a feeling of freedom and independence. The more difficult the path, the more interesting and joyful it is despite you realize it only at the end of the path. So, here’s my motto “If you’re dead – keep going”.

And of course, a bicycle unites the world. I figured out this over time, when I met and got acquainted with the most interesting bike lovers around the world. In short, the person who invented a bicycle is a great person.

What is your favourite set up?

Fixed gear. My first bike was a fixed gear and it is still a fixed gear. Moreover, as a beginner, I bought a Fuji, and had been cycling on it for 4 years and only recently I’ve changed it to a less heavy Aventon. I like being tied to a bike in the truest sense of the word.

As I said, I bought it as a mean for faster and more affordable traveling around the city. I’d been cycling from 20 to 30 km per day. But when I put an end to short stops during cycling, I started to ride from 40 to 90 km per day.

My friends advise me to buy road bike for a long distance. But I am not intimidated by long distances on the fix. By now, the maximum distance I’ve ridden was 150 km on the route from St. Petersburg to Vyborg. And I’m going to ride even more. I am very inspired by people who travel on a fixed gear or go to the mountains on a fix. They’re tremendously strong and enduring!

Do you think the environment is male dominated? If yes what are your
thoughts about it?

My take on this matter is that men dominate cycling, as well as many kinds of sports or other areas. But that’s okay for me, I’m not a feminist lol. Perhaps this was a problem a long time ago, when women were oppressed, but in the modern world I think it is all right, at least I have not encountered it.

On the contrary, I began to notice there are more and more women cyclists. And that is great trend!

Any riding plans for the future?

I was going to go to Spain this year with my fix and have a ride from Barcelona to Valencia. This would have been the beginning of my first journey on a bike. But the virus broke everyone’s plans. So I keep the same plan for next year. 

And also I do plan to buy a road bike to ride really steep mountains.

To be honest, I never thought that I would ever think about cycling. And that a bicycle can give such intense pleasure and even can change your worldview.

A bicycle makes you strong not only physically, but also spiritually. It allows you to enjoy your path, your own strength and the beauty of surrounding environment. All that is required of you is not to give up and try hard. A bike is a marvelous invention in all respects.

Ride like a girl is a series of interviews with WTNB (women trans non-binary) riders from around the world. If you would like to be contributed drop us an email.


Name: Julia Ida Pantkowska 

Location: Barcelona (I’m actually originally from Poland but grew up in the in Manchester UK I’ve been living in Spain for 3 years now. Right now in Barcelona)

Discipline: I really love cyclocross and gravel, currently you might spot me in the city with a Omnium cargo though. 

What does riding mean to you?

It’s another way of expressing myself, getting all my energy out and turning it into something positive. Not only it gives me freedom and confidence but makes me want to work on myself and constantly improve. 

I use my bike to commute and also I have a bike messaging company Early Bird Courier based in Barcelona so it’s a way of living. I’m a firm believer in green living and a practitioner of zero waste. I’m also a huge fan of bikepacking and going out into the forest, being in one with nature, as the city can be a busy place… 

I believe that riding is another form of art just like a painting. 

‌Riding my bike gives me motivation and happiness and I love it when you can share this with somebody else… 

What is your favourite set up?

Actually I have a couple of different bikes, at the moment I’m using Stevens Super Prestige Ultegra di2 with DT Swiss wheel, I also love using the Omnium Cargo Shimano XT – it is just incredible, can move mountains with this bike. Thanks Omnium for creating this beast.

Do you think the environment is male dominated?

Yes, I really think it is, this is the reason why I have decided to start my own messaging company with my boyfriend as the cycling world is so male-dominated. And this is one of the main reasons why I really want to make an impact within this industry. I believe that us girls we are strong and the world needs to know about i! We got this!

Any riding plans for the future?

Well there are so many that I have planned, however, I’m now concentrating on Early Bird Courier, it is something that I have put a lot of love and effort it. So, for now, we will stick with delivering in the city and supporting a small company. And of course, more bike packing trips in the near future.

Ride like a girl is a series of interviews with WTNB (women trans non-binary) riders from around the world. If you would like to be contributed drop us an email.


Name/location/discipline

Amanda Bryan and I hail from Bellingham, WA (USA) but I currently live in Fayettville, WV. I enjoy many different disciplines of the sport but I mostly identify as a mountain biker. My riding preference is more on the gravity spectrum of MTB’ing but I also really enjoy multi-day bikepacking adventures  or spending an afternoon at the local pumptrack.

What does riding mean to you?

This, to me, is a really big question. Bicycles gave me a purpose and riding gave me an outlet that I didn’t know I needed. Before I discovered mountain bikes, I was pretty lost. I was living in Seattle, WA half-ass going to college and working 4 part time jobs. Burning the candle at both ends is an understatement.

Then I discovered mountain biking and it brought me back to being curious about the natural world. Riding brought me back to being a kid that spends all day in the dirt, in the woods. Bicycles made me think about mental health and its relationship to my physical health. This incredible machine introduced me to an amazing community that networks globally!

Riding my bike has given me the opportunity to travel the country and create a family that spreads across the US. My bicycle has taken me to foreign countries and has allowed me to experience other cultures all from my saddle. Riding to me means choosing freedom and mental health and community.

What is your favourite set up?

I don’t have a favourite so I’ll share a few if that’s ok!

  1. I love my full-suspension bikes with all my heart but nothing rides like a steel Kona Honzo. The geo and material of that bike is designed for pure shredding. It’s snappy and playful and wants to be in the air and feels the most at home on steep, chunky terrain. Even though Kona markets it as a all-mountain hardtail, which it is, it’s my weapon of choice for XC days and long pedals. I rock the Tenet Bodem C bar with a 25mm rise and cut at 770mm length. That’s combined with a Chromag BZA 35mm stem. I have Hope pro 4 hubs laced up to WTB rims that sport Maxxis Minions front and rear.
  2. The bikepacking rig of choice for me is a Kona Unit X. I have the 2020 model that shows off a beautiful champagne gold and might be my most favourite thing about this bike. Its current setup is a pair of Soma Osprey swept back handle bars for wrist comfort and 29X3.0 WTB ranger tires. I took this bike on the 300 mile Cape Loop route at the southern tip of the Baja Peninsula, at the beginning of the year and the tires were clutch for all the sand. The Unit X rocks a PackNW frame bag at all times that is a custom, handmade frame bag by a women own and lead business out of Bellingham, WA. Almost all of my bags for bike trips are made by Hilary at PackNW.
  3. I feel I have to talk about my cruiser townie bicycle. I own a 2015 Humuhumu. That’s short for the original name Humuhumu Nukunuku a Pua’a – after a Hawaiian native fish – and is one of the most cool looking cruiser bikes, ever. It has a heavy moto influence and is set up single speed. I have the teal frame and I dressed it up with custom purple glitter decals and purple cog and chainring along with purple cable and housing. It always turns heads when I’m pedaling around the city or have it parked outside the pub.

Do you think the environment is male dominated? If yes what are your
thoughts about it?

I do think the cycling industry is male-dominated and I believe that it hurts the cycling industry as a whole. Most companies are owned and operated by a white, cis male population and most upper level, management positions are held by cis men. The majority of bike shops are owned my cis men and the majority of folks that are employed in bike shops are cis-gendered men.

I am currently employed by a bicycle company and I am the only female on a sales team of 11 in the USA. Part of my job is to visit bike shops across the United States and I am often the only woman in the shop and on shop rides. When I get to walk in to a shop and work with a non-cis male owner or manager, I get stoked! When I get invited to a women’s ride or a FTW ride, I feel safe and that energy space fills the tank. I don’t just think it should change, I think it has to change. We need to see more non-cis men in leadership roles and more of those folks at the table, at all times.

Any riding plans for the future?

At the time of writing this, the USA is dealing with the COVID-19 pandemic nationwide so most of my big riding plans are on hold but I have a MTB trip to Oaxaca, Mexico with a group of women riders that I’m really looking forward to. I’ve also got a bikepacking trip in the fall in Idaho with one of my best friends. Besides those bigger trips, I can’t wait to travel across the country and ride in new places with new people!

Ride like a girl is a series of interviews with WTNB (women trans non-binary) riders from around the world. If you would like to be contributed drop us an email.


Name: Siri Tolander 
Location: Stockholm/Sweden 
Discipline: Mostly fixed but putting together a road bike and I do very much enjoy touring.

What does riding mean to you?

It’s pretty much an obsession and a big part of my life. I hardly ever train but I ride every day. It has given me a job, a lot of friends, a context when I felt a bit lost. 

What is your favourite set up?

My favourite right now is prob my Cinelli with Alpina fork, Nitto bullmoose and 47/17 gear. Got 47/17 on my Panasonic as well, it’s good for touring and working. It has ridic wide bars. Might be my actual favourite, not sure, depends on the day….

Do you think the environment is male dominated? If yes what are your thoughts about it?

It definitely is male dominated. Super tricky subject. In Stockholm we are quite a few WTNB people in the cycling community but still very outnumbered by men and I often feel like I need to prove myself to be included. There’s however more awareness now with for example WTNB specific spots in certain events as an attempt to be more inclusive. And I do believe in affirmative actions to make a difference, to just wait and hope people will find their way to the community is not gonna work. I know I’m not the best in actually taking action but in my opinion the larger group (as in cis male in this situation) should take the larger responsibility in being more inclusive. It shouldn’t be the responsibility of the subaltern although it tends to be so.

In the international messenger scene we’re working a lot with e.g. representation and wages but in Sthlm right now there are unfortunately not many non cis male working.

Any riding plans for the future?

My plan was to do the Sverigetempot on fixed but now it’s cancelled because of the pandemic so I think there will be some socially distant solo riding instead.

Ride like a girl is a series of interviews with WTNB (women trans non-binary) riders from around the world. If you would like to be contributed drop us an email.


Name: Eva Rieb
Location: Berlin
Discipline: fixed gear / fixed freestyle

What does riding mean to you?

On the one hand, generally speaking, cycling through the streets is how freedom feels to me. The daily pattern is what keeps you running – somehow – but rather like a hamster in a running wheel.

And when do you make your very own decisions? When are you really free? When do you just let go and push yourself to your own limits at the same time? Cycling is more than just a sport to me. It’s drifting into another world. Or running off when everything is getting too much. When I’m cycling, I’m one with the bike. It means to be free, to let go and to let your thoughts just be, going beyond your boundaries, which are mostly created in your own mind. It’s getting to know yourself better and better.

Furthermore, I love how connective this sport is. It’s very inspiring how the cycling community is supporting and welcoming each other, which is internationally speaking a very beautiful thing too. On the other hand, cycling, especially fixed freestyle, means to me hanging out together on random spots in the streets. Enjoying life, having a good time while drinking beer and cheering on everybody when landing tricks. French cyclists taught me how to put his feeling in just one word: „Chistole“!

What is your favourite set up?

Well, I have two fixed gear bikes. One steel from „State Bicycle“ and one aluminium/carbon from „Jam“. My steel bike has a very emotional worth, as everything I experienced, started with it. I still use it from time to time, but since I got my second bike two years ago, I totally fell in love with this set up. It’s so smooth, light and easy to go fast and push yourself with, as well as doing tricks on it. For me it combines everything I want to.

Do you think the environment is male dominated? If yes what are your thoughts about it?

Simone de Beauvoir wrote a lot about doing gender. She says: “You aren’t born a woman, you become one”. If we want to know how environment is working, we should stop comparing different times and places or making surveys. It’s so simple, because we all could just ask ourselves why things are like they are: by listening, looking around and understanding. We literally have to open our eyes.

To put it all in a nutshell: As we all grew up in a patriarchate, I’d definitely say that the environment is male dominated. E.g.: there are so many great and sportive women out there, who don’t get the same attention as men do. As long as women get marginalized and don’t get the same access to different sports; as long as women don’t get paid equally; as long as they’re getting valued by everybody; as long as the people in power are mostly men and desexualize women in higher positions (such as German chancellor Angela Merkel) to let them look stupid, feel unworthy and nonserious; as long as Disney-movies, youth magazines etc keep up the picture that women are not capable of doing great things on their very own but giving 1000 tips of how to look sexy – especially for men and as long as the mentioned points don’t change, I’m convinced that the environment is male dominated and at least focused on how to get liked by men. All the movements, polarizations, sensitizations and education are and will be completely necessary until the point where is no inequality, bodyshaming or oppression.

It may sound idealistic and I’m definitely not speaking about men’s collective guilt but I’m speaking about the fact that we still haven’t burst the bonds of patriarchalism, we just learned to live with them…

Any riding plans for the future?

I really fancy buying a gravel bike as soon as possible. Three years ago I did my very first bikepacking trip through Sweden. While experiencing every imaginable emotion, I loved cycling through nature, streets and to put my tent whenever I felt to. Students lifestyle makes it hard buying my dream bike and going abroad with it, but I’m positive and looking forward already;)

Ride like a girl is a series of interviews with WTF (women *trans femme) riders from around the world. If you would like to be contributed drop us an email.


Name: Karolina Grzybowska / Principessa on the bike
Location: Barcelona / Spain
Discipline: road/ fixed gear/ track 

I’m from Warsaw, but since May 2019, I have been living in Barcelona. I mainly do road, but I also love my fixie, which I use for city rides and commuting. My track bike is for velodrome rides – I sometimes do track races. 

What does riding mean to you?

It means A LOT 😀

I don’t often think about what a bicycle means to me, but I often wonder why I ride – probably because a lot of people outside of the cycling community ask about that.

I ride because it’s a pure pleasure for me. I ride to feel the wind in my hair and the sun on my skin. I ride to breathe, to clear my mind. I ride to work to avoid traffic jams. I ride to escape from the world when it’s driving me crazy. I ride because riding gives me moments of excitement and wonder. I ride for fun, for training and scary moments. Sometimes I ride to impress somebody or to break my limits. I ride for the feeling of total control and independence. I ride to meet new people and my friends. I ride to think and to have new ideas during the ride. I ride to reduce stress. I ride to be in good shape, so I don’t need to go to a gym. I ride for all these endorphins. I ride for adventure and thousands of beautiful views. I ride because I want to be a part of the community that adores cycling. I ride because I appreciate the simple form of movement on a bike and the look of this amazing machine. Often I ride on my bike just to ride on the bike. I ride to commute or to race. I ride because I like it. I ride for myself.

What is your favourite set up?

I don’t have a favorite setup. I have different bikes which I use for different occasions – the mountains, the city, the track – but if I had to choose one, it would be my road bike – Cinelli Faster. My road bike & mountains, where I go to lose my mind and find my soul. To escape and take a breath.

Do you think the environment is male-dominated?

Yes, but this problem is not limited to cycling. We live in a world dominated by men, and because of this, there is a certain amount of gender discrimination in every sport. I think it might even be more prevalent amongst those more experienced or older, such as referees or commentators – maybe it’s some sort of old school thinking. They often treat men’s cycling as better, more spectacular, or even the only valid one.

However, I have not felt any form of discrimination or dominance from my cycling friends. They are very open and tolerant, just normal. We feel equal.

Fortunately, the world is changing, so the old school thinking is fading away. From generation to generation, women fight for their rights to have equal rights both on a competitive level or just riding in a group. 

The girls bike community is growing, so the bike races are more equal to the men’s world. I feel cool about it. Chicks ride faster and faster. Stronger and stronger! ♥

Any riding plans for the future?

Another year of exploring Spain. Still, so many mountains to climb. So many places to see yet.

Currently, it’s forbidden to leave the region due to the pandemic, but when better times come, I’m going to ride into the local mountains again.

Another event on my list is to organize the upcoming Women’s 100 this year. Thousands of women gather into groups around the world and ride 100 km on bikes. Girls from the Warsaw area come together to celebrate women’s cycling. So far, I have managed to organize six such events, each with more participants. I can’t wait for the next time!

Ride like a girl is a series of interviews with WTF (women *trans femme) riders from around the world. If you would like to be contributed drop us an email.


Name/location/discipline

Dazie Holt
Brooklyn New York
Road, Track/fixed crits, Gravel/off-road

What does riding mean to you?

Riding, to me and probably most people, is pure freedom. I come and go and do whatever I want as I please without waiting for other people or transportation schedules. I always joke that riding a bike to me is like when Regina George joined lacrosse at the end of Mean Girls. It’s an important way for me to better connect with myself and other people, and work my body into shape to try to have an overall healthier lifestyle. Plus I love going fast, I love pushing myself and I’ve found a great way to do that with cycling and racing.

What is your favourite set up?

My favourite set up is whatever I’m riding that day honestly.
I really enjoy all of my bikes, and they’re all very specifically set up to do exactly what they are supposed to do. My Surly Straggler is probably my most versatile bike, but I’m strongly attached to my road bike and fixed ones as well. I came from riding fixed bikes back in 2012/13, so they’ll always have a special place with me.

Do you think the environment is male dominated?

I totally think the Industry is male-dominated. Almost everything is. But does that mean I think women don’t have a voice, or that men control everything overall? Absolutely not. To this day, women don’t get the same national media coverage. We aren’t allowed to race in TDF [Tour the France]. We don’t get the same timeslots, the same coverage, the same pay rates. This is all globally. However, I think locally with in the community, there’s tons of super strong women who are leaders and who are trying to change this narrative. More women ride bikes than ever before, but in the race scene there’s more men. So that’s the conflict right? How do we make Cycling and Racing more accessible or appealing to the women who are already riding when the general community is so male driven.

Any riding plans for the future?

My riding plans for the future? Honestly, probably tomorrow. All racing is canceled for the foreseeable future, so it’s been up to individuals to create their own fun. I worked on my bike about four days a week before, but now I’m using this free time to do a lot more road and gravel rides which I’ve reallllyyy been enjoying. It’s been great to take a small step back and ride purely for the love of it, without feeling the pass and fail pressure of training. To just reconnect.

Mission crit could be happening in September, and same with Intellegencia in July, so those are my races for this year I’m trying to go to, obviously it’s all up in the air however. But I truly love the community of people who hold these races and make it happen for us, so I deeply appreciate you people and those who show up to make it possible.

Ride like a girl is a series of interviews with WTF (women *trans femme) riders from around the world. If you would like to be contributed drop us an email.


Name/location/discipline

Kristina/Malmö/Fixed gear

What does riding mean to you?

Riding is my everyday life. As a bike messenger – I make my living by riding. I commute almost everywhere by bike and this gives me loads of independence from public transport systems. In the rare cases that I actually walk, I feel weird and slow.

Riding means power. Power to give a positive example and do my fair share of environmentalism. I especially enjoy riding in traffic jams and filtering through cars. It gives me huge satisfaction knowing that car drivers are probably secretly jealous of my ability to move much quicker than them. At the same time I am hoping that they will sooner or later take the decision to leave the car in the garage and get on their own bikes instead to gain the same freedom of movement they saw in me.

Whenever my soul empties because of the urban environment, I take a ride out of the city and I recharge really quickly. Cycling helps me escape all devices that steal my attention from the real world. It is the time to be fully and truly with myself.

Cycling has the ability to intensify my emotions (maybe because all distractions are put aside) and it is then when I can feel that joy of being alive, exploding in my whole body. But sometimes it can be scary.

If I am going through a difficult period of my life, getting on my bike means that I will face my deepest fears and I will have to do it all alone. It is beautiful how simply the motion of pushing pedals can bring you so many different experiences and feelings, depending on your needs and surroundings.

What is your favourite set up?

Two wheels and a frame is my favourite. If it rolls – then it is perfect. I usually ride my fixie and I truly appreciate when the pedals push my feet instead of the opposite. That bike is a true friend sharing the effort and always makes me feel snippity snap. 

When I feel like a grown up, I do enjoy the Omnium cargo and especially the fact that I can give rides to my beloved ones. 

Do you think the environment is male dominated?

I think the environment is human dominated. The community here in Malmo is so extremely welcoming to every living and breathing creature on a bicycle so not for a moment have I felt any special treatment for the fact that I am a girl on a bicycle.

Everyone is really supportive, friendly and happy when new people join the community so gender absolutely does not factor in. Basically, ‘the more the merrier’ is above everything else.

Any riding plans for the future?

All of the grand ones – going through Europe – from Scandinavia to the Balkans; cycling to the Arctic circle etc. But these are more like – one day, when I have the time. As of now, I don’t plan anything but a few days ahead, which leaves a lot of space for being spontaneous and go with the flow. The usual pattern is to check out the weather forecast and follow the direction of the wind:) No joke – aways a winning strategy!

Ride like a girl is a series of interviews with WTF (women *trans femme) riders from around the world. If you would like to be contributed drop us an email.


Name/location/discipline

Zofia Kowalczyk aka Zofix
Warsaw/Poland
Fixed gear

What does riding mean to you?

When I think of riding a bike, first things that come to my mind are: friends, freedom and commuting. I love the fact, that I met so many great people because of this little riding thing. I feel like I’m a part of a big family – and I’m not just talking about my closest friends, but all of peeps that ride. It’s that beautiful little thing about this kind of communities. I’m also (for now pretty shitty, but wait for it) a skateboarder and it’s the same thing – wherever you are, you’re part of it.

And freedom? Actually I don’t know how to explain this. It’s the feeling when it is just you and your bike – it could be in a crowded city, forest or while riding along beautiful beach – in the end it doesn’t matter. I have 4 loves of my life that gives me this feeling – fixed gear, snowboard, skateboard and analog photography. I can’t pick one, they’re very different, but when one of them is missing, I’m not 100% me.

What is your favourite set up?

My favourite set up is of course my current bike! I’m riding a custom Mielec frame with little lo-pro with carbon Aventon fork, Factory5 lattice chainring (fuckin’ love it), Omnium crank, H+Son Archetype rims, Miche Pista hubs, carbon riser, Cinelli Pista stem and my favourite Continental 4 season tires – they’re indestructible!

But if I could get whatever I want, I would definitely pick Cannondale Track frame from 1995’ or my best friend’s bike – he has black lo-pro, which looks like a devil and I love it with all my heart.

pic. Tomasz Seruga

Do you think the environment is male dominated?

Well…there are more men riding, but I don’t think it’s really dominated by them. Or maybe I should say – I don’t feel like I’m in a male dominated environment. That’s kinda natural that when there’s more men or women the atmosphere is not the same, but I never felt like an outsider because of my gender. Every year more and more girls starts to ride, build/fix their bikes or just get to know this culture. And I’m not talking about those girls from instagram pics that are just posing on fixed gears in short skirts, I’m talking about all girls that actually RIDE! 

Any riding plans for the future?

I don’t like making plans for things like that. All I want is to still have so much fun of riding my fixed gear. The best of my “bike memories” are the result of spontaneous decisions. So my only plan is to not have one and enjoy every second of it!

Ride like a girl is a series of interviews with WTF (women *trans femme) riders from around the world. If you would like to be contributed drop us an email.


Name: Julka Plenzler
Location: Poznan/ Poland
Discipline: fixed gear/ bike polo

What does riding mean to you?

Last year I started riding a fixed gear and immediately fell in love with it.

For me cycling is a way of spending my free time and the best form of transport. You don’t need money, driving license, all you need is a bike and willingness. Bike gives a lot of possibilities, you can get anywhere you want… ride to forest, to the mountains, to a beach. You can race with the cars in the urban jungle, play bike polo… It’s amazing.

What is your favourite set up?

Currently I am riding on a fixed gear, I have a steel frame from Csepel. I love that black beauty, she is indestructible like me!

Do you think the environment is male dominated?

Definitely yes, the environment is dominated by male riders. Girls on bikes aren’t taken seriously, rather like an attraction… I hope it will change soon and it will become normal that girls ride bikes and do it awesome.

I’m glad, that where I live I have good male friends who support me, help to learn new tricks and as a woman I never felt worse in their company.

I think girls should support each other more, not treat each other only as competitors.

Any riding plans for the future?

Summer is coming! I want to do more kilometers, of course go to PCMC [Polish Cycling Messengers Championships] and I want to test my skills on a velodrome.

Ride like a girl is a series of interviews with WTF (women *trans femme) riders from around the world. If you would like to be contributed drop us an email.