Name/location/discipline

I’m Jasmine Naea, I live in LA, I ride and race road and fixed gear in crits.

What does riding mean to you?

Riding my bike means everything to me, it means freedom, it means power. The bike makes me feel in control and it makes me feel like I’m flying. 

What is your favourite set up?

Currently my favourite set up is my All-City Cosmic Stallion, it’s a 1x 11 speed. I use it for fun when I’m not racing, and for commuting.

Do you think the environment is male dominated? If yes what are your
thoughts about it?

The cycling community is totally male dominated. In some spaces or communities it’s an issue because gender equality is often overlooked. In our community we focus on inspiring new women to ride with us and become comfortable on the bike. I personally have never felt pushed out or discouraged by any men. I think that even men are aware that there is only a small amount of women and I feel they want that to change too. I believe in change, for equality, and not just in the bike scene/community. I believe as women, we have the power to control all aspects of our future if we work together. 

Any riding plans for the future?

The future seems so uncertain and I’m okay with that, I currently want to ride to my favourite mountain this weekend with a good friend. As for next year I’m praying for a full season to prove my abilities and upgrade my road category. But even if COVID prevents us from having another racing season, I’ll still commute and explore, with my favourite people.

Ride like a girl is a series of interviews with WTNB (women trans non-binary) riders from around the world. If you would like to be contributed drop us an email.


Name: Eva Rieb
Location: Berlin
Discipline: fixed gear / fixed freestyle

What does riding mean to you?

On the one hand, generally speaking, cycling through the streets is how freedom feels to me. The daily pattern is what keeps you running – somehow – but rather like a hamster in a running wheel.

And when do you make your very own decisions? When are you really free? When do you just let go and push yourself to your own limits at the same time? Cycling is more than just a sport to me. It’s drifting into another world. Or running off when everything is getting too much. When I’m cycling, I’m one with the bike. It means to be free, to let go and to let your thoughts just be, going beyond your boundaries, which are mostly created in your own mind. It’s getting to know yourself better and better.

Furthermore, I love how connective this sport is. It’s very inspiring how the cycling community is supporting and welcoming each other, which is internationally speaking a very beautiful thing too. On the other hand, cycling, especially fixed freestyle, means to me hanging out together on random spots in the streets. Enjoying life, having a good time while drinking beer and cheering on everybody when landing tricks. French cyclists taught me how to put his feeling in just one word: „Chistole“!

What is your favourite set up?

Well, I have two fixed gear bikes. One steel from „State Bicycle“ and one aluminium/carbon from „Jam“. My steel bike has a very emotional worth, as everything I experienced, started with it. I still use it from time to time, but since I got my second bike two years ago, I totally fell in love with this set up. It’s so smooth, light and easy to go fast and push yourself with, as well as doing tricks on it. For me it combines everything I want to.

Do you think the environment is male dominated? If yes what are your thoughts about it?

Simone de Beauvoir wrote a lot about doing gender. She says: “You aren’t born a woman, you become one”. If we want to know how environment is working, we should stop comparing different times and places or making surveys. It’s so simple, because we all could just ask ourselves why things are like they are: by listening, looking around and understanding. We literally have to open our eyes.

To put it all in a nutshell: As we all grew up in a patriarchate, I’d definitely say that the environment is male dominated. E.g.: there are so many great and sportive women out there, who don’t get the same attention as men do. As long as women get marginalized and don’t get the same access to different sports; as long as women don’t get paid equally; as long as they’re getting valued by everybody; as long as the people in power are mostly men and desexualize women in higher positions (such as German chancellor Angela Merkel) to let them look stupid, feel unworthy and nonserious; as long as Disney-movies, youth magazines etc keep up the picture that women are not capable of doing great things on their very own but giving 1000 tips of how to look sexy – especially for men and as long as the mentioned points don’t change, I’m convinced that the environment is male dominated and at least focused on how to get liked by men. All the movements, polarizations, sensitizations and education are and will be completely necessary until the point where is no inequality, bodyshaming or oppression.

It may sound idealistic and I’m definitely not speaking about men’s collective guilt but I’m speaking about the fact that we still haven’t burst the bonds of patriarchalism, we just learned to live with them…

Any riding plans for the future?

I really fancy buying a gravel bike as soon as possible. Three years ago I did my very first bikepacking trip through Sweden. While experiencing every imaginable emotion, I loved cycling through nature, streets and to put my tent whenever I felt to. Students lifestyle makes it hard buying my dream bike and going abroad with it, but I’m positive and looking forward already;)

Ride like a girl is a series of interviews with WTF (women *trans femme) riders from around the world. If you would like to be contributed drop us an email.


Name/location/discipline

Dazie Holt
Brooklyn New York
Road, Track/fixed crits, Gravel/off-road

What does riding mean to you?

Riding, to me and probably most people, is pure freedom. I come and go and do whatever I want as I please without waiting for other people or transportation schedules. I always joke that riding a bike to me is like when Regina George joined lacrosse at the end of Mean Girls. It’s an important way for me to better connect with myself and other people, and work my body into shape to try to have an overall healthier lifestyle. Plus I love going fast, I love pushing myself and I’ve found a great way to do that with cycling and racing.

What is your favourite set up?

My favourite set up is whatever I’m riding that day honestly.
I really enjoy all of my bikes, and they’re all very specifically set up to do exactly what they are supposed to do. My Surly Straggler is probably my most versatile bike, but I’m strongly attached to my road bike and fixed ones as well. I came from riding fixed bikes back in 2012/13, so they’ll always have a special place with me.

Do you think the environment is male dominated?

I totally think the Industry is male-dominated. Almost everything is. But does that mean I think women don’t have a voice, or that men control everything overall? Absolutely not. To this day, women don’t get the same national media coverage. We aren’t allowed to race in TDF [Tour the France]. We don’t get the same timeslots, the same coverage, the same pay rates. This is all globally. However, I think locally with in the community, there’s tons of super strong women who are leaders and who are trying to change this narrative. More women ride bikes than ever before, but in the race scene there’s more men. So that’s the conflict right? How do we make Cycling and Racing more accessible or appealing to the women who are already riding when the general community is so male driven.

Any riding plans for the future?

My riding plans for the future? Honestly, probably tomorrow. All racing is canceled for the foreseeable future, so it’s been up to individuals to create their own fun. I worked on my bike about four days a week before, but now I’m using this free time to do a lot more road and gravel rides which I’ve reallllyyy been enjoying. It’s been great to take a small step back and ride purely for the love of it, without feeling the pass and fail pressure of training. To just reconnect.

Mission crit could be happening in September, and same with Intellegencia in July, so those are my races for this year I’m trying to go to, obviously it’s all up in the air however. But I truly love the community of people who hold these races and make it happen for us, so I deeply appreciate you people and those who show up to make it possible.

Ride like a girl is a series of interviews with WTF (women *trans femme) riders from around the world. If you would like to be contributed drop us an email.


Name/location/discipline

Name: Milana Barbosa
Location: Seattle, Washington, USA
Discipline: Courier/Cyclist/Prince

What does riding mean to you?

Riding a bicycle has many different meanings and definitions to me, like it’s my only way to get around beside public transportation. I enjoy traveling and using city transit, but being able to move freely and having the autonomy to stop or go as fast as I like is really important to me. Touring across countries or even states has really given perspective on how amazing the human body is and how much power you truly have. In that sense riding is a strong key that should be utilized more and not underestimated.

I have never driven cars nor do I have any intention of driving in my life. I don’t judge people who have licenses, as I understand the practicality and efficiency of driving for work or various activities, but for my life I would rather use transit or cycling to get from point A to point B than moving around in a vehicle in which I think is too much power or responsibility for most people.

Riding is also a means of income. Working as a courier I rely on my physical abilities and bikes to provide for me, as I pay for rent, food (fuel costs), clothes, traveling, etc from being on the road. I couldn’t imagine what my life would be like without cycling. Riding means the world to me, and is my world.

What is your favorite set up?

Right now for work I am riding a simple steel road bike. The hills and rain in Seattle can be a lot sometimes so I try and find whatever set up is the most fun or comfortable for that season or time. As the winter approaches I switch to my single speed mountain bike and hop around the city. For touring I have been riding fixed. The ease of packing up my fixed gear bike to fly overseas with makes it very simple and ideal to travel with. Im not sure if I have a favorite set up as a whole but favorite set ups for different cycling activities.

Do you think the environment is male dominated?

I know the environment is male dominated. For every courier event, bike race, commuter group, etc, you can just open your eyes and see that. The community breeds a culture of male dominance and thus makes it unwelcoming for a lot of WTF to become messengers, race, or even ride a bike. Of the WTF I do know that ride I have nothing but the utmost respect and love for. I have worked on the road for only 4 years now and that many of the WTF that I see now have paved the way for me to feel included. Awaremess and Starbma are organisations that were created to fight abusive behaviour and open the doors to various groups that struggle within the community.

I think it’s my responsibility at this point to go to as many events or races as I possible to give presence for WTF and POC but also to look/prevent/stop inappropriate behaviour. I also believe that is the responsibility of all of my male friends to realize their privilege and use it to help promote POC/WTF attendance and recognition in the cycling world. The environment is male dominated but as long as we keep making strides in the right direction I believe we can change this.

Any riding plans for the future?

As I write this I am in a Frankfurt messenger office on vacation and riding around a familiar but still new city. Every year I go to at least one national/international event to see old friends, make new friends, and support the WTF/POC that also attend. For 2020 if money and holiday days permit me I plan on touring from Milan-Grenoble-Basel in the Summer to go to ECMC. For the autumn it’s NACCC in Boston and CMWC in Bogota. I have a lot of planning and money saving to do. I will also try and do smaller tours with my best friend around Seattle to nearby cities. As of right now my plan is to ride around Berlin this weekend and return to Seattle to work as a courier until I travel again.

Ride like a girl is a series of interviews with WTF (women *trans femme) riders from around the world. If you would like to be contributed drop us an email.


Name/location/discipline

Anny Vera, I’m from Santiago de Cali, Colombia. I’m urban cyclist, fixed gear racer, bike courier and pro bike activist. I breathe bicycle at all times of my life.

What does riding mean to you?

It is an indescribable freedom, it has changed my life completely.
Riding a bicycle gives me power, desire, joy, I feel that I have lost my fear of mobilizing alone over time, because it is not easy to be a cycling woman in a country like mine, but the bicycle took away my fears and put courage on my way.

What is your favourite set up?

Since I started in this dream I have been riding a mountain bike, a road bike, and finally a fixed gear, the latter became my favorite. I started using fixed about 3 years, and since then I have not stopped. I use it to compete, work, train, explore, have fun. With it I have experimented in the criteriums [fixed gear race on closed streets], I have won many alleycats [usually fixed gear race in the normal street traffic], and now I am starting to train tracklocross [usually fixed gear bikes set up to race in dirt].

Do you think the environment is male dominated?

Well, yes, like almost everything in the world. I think it is a matter of history in which women have been subject to certain rules, and where we have been banned from certain things. Women began to use the bicycle many years after men, and at first it was taken as a way of revolution and freedom, women was judged, pointed out, violated. It has been a process of years of incorporating ourselves into society making use of the bicycle, especially if it is used as a means of transport, the streets and people are aggressive and dangerous, and more for women, it takes time, falls and bad times to get used to mobilize alone and losing our fear.

Women go through different processes with the bicycle. I know stories of women who stop using the bike because they are tired of sexual harassment, or because they don’t feel safe, they prefer to stop than to expose themselves. And it is a reality that occurs in many countries of the world.
On the other hand, in the competitive field we also see fewer women than men, much less sport activities for women, and less economic support.
But it makes me very happy to see how everything is changing today, and there are more women who decide to get on the bike and change their lives. The bike is only one in general, but there are many possible paths to travel, you just have to take risks and decide which path you like best.

Any riding plans for the future?

Many, for now I plan to resume my bike training in January, continue competing in alleycats, urban races and messenger competitions that take place throughout Colombia.
As a big and important plan, I plan to travel to Basel, Switzerland in 2020, to attend the European Cycling Messengers Championships. And of course from September 21 to 26 the ride and parties are in Bogotá during the World Championship, CMWC. Great projects and plans are coming with the bicycle.

Ride like a girl is a series of interviews with WTF (women *trans femme) riders from around the world. If you would like to be contributed drop us an email.


Name/location/discipline

Justyna John (but everyone says Tina). I live in Warsaw, Poland. I’m an editor of the 43ride bike magazine. I love downhill but sometimes I also like endure and dirt jumping.

What does riding mean to you?

Mountainbiking is my whole life except for work in government administration.

It’s a way of spending free time, friends, testing bicycle components and, above all, great joy. I used to race in competitions, but because of an injury I had to end my career – then the whole world collapsed. I found a way to connect a “normal” life with my beloved bikes. Sometimes it requires advanced logistics, but I manage;)

What is your favourite set up?

It depends on the bike I ride in the season. I’m testing a lot of new bike parts, including frames and cushioning. At the moment I’m happy with the bike of the Polish brand NS Bikes, but I’m thinking about changing to a new model (for new standard – 29”). In general, Poles make very good cycling equipment – I’m proud of it.

Do you think the environment is male dominated?

Definitely downhill is the mens world. I have never been treated badly just because I’m a woman. But I have no problem with the fact that I have few mountainbiking girlfriends – I like to ride with boys. I have a more masculine character, so it suits me. Will this change? I don’t know, many women choose enduro because it’s easier. It does not require breaking the fear of jumping large obstacles, trails are easier. Downhill is a sport for tough guys;)

Any riding plans for the future?

I travel a lot with the bike – I love bikeparks in Austria, I loved Maribor in Slovenia. My dream is to spend a few weeks in Whistler, Canada. This is the Mecca of every gravity biker. I would also like to ride enduro in beautiful Scotland, where I feel at home.

Ride like a girl is a series of interviews with WTF (women *trans femme) riders from around the world. If you would like to be contributed drop us an email.


It does not matter if you just popped out for a weekend, head for a life journey, like riding a track bike or you are getting #backontrack after a difficult time in life. Just enjoy it.

Design: Justyna Frąckiewicz

 


W końcu się udało i mamy pierwszy kit!

Siła. Moc. Wytrzymałość. Prędkość. To cztery filary kolarstwa. na których opiera się zawodowe i amatorskie współzawodnictwo. Nam jednak zależy na tym piątym, nieuchwytnym elemencie, na który składa się szum kół, nowe drogi, nowe widoki, nowe doświadczenia. To właśnie dlatego powstał Cheesy Cycling Kit, nieważne czy się ścigasz, czy gubisz na bezdrożach, czy interesują Cię WATy, czy nowe widoki, Cheesy Cycling Kit spełni Twoje wymagania. Wiemy to, bo sami go sprawdziliśmy zarówno w warunkach „bojowych”, w luźnych jazdach, jak i w przełajach. Cheesy Cycling Kit to zmaterializowanie naszych wartości.

Kit składa się z koszulki, spodenek i skarpet i można go zamówić tutaj.

Projekt: Saiko Ikko.

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